College life is an exciting time for young adults. For many it is the first time they are able to ‘spread their wings’ and experience life on their own. The demands of University life today are above and beyond previous generations. The stress and pressure placed on college students forces them to make risky decisions. The pressure to perform has pushed many college students to abuse ‘study drugs’ to help them increase their scores. Studies have shown that a great majority of college students have admitted to abusing study drugs to help them increase their scores. This practice is dangerous because ADHD and ADD medications they are abusing are dangerous, but also because it can lead to even more dangerous behavior. Study drugs can act like gateway drugs. In fact, prescription drugs have replaced marijuana as the number one used gateway drug. In an effort to reverse this trend, counselors are working with college students to help them transition into college life.

Counselors Can Help

Campus counseling centers are beacons of hope and help for college students who feel overwhelmed by their classes. Anyone struggling with any variety of problems should seek help from a campus counseling center. These individuals are well versed in the complexities of college life. They can help students with time management, tutoring, social problems and a variety of psychological issues that are plaguing the student. Students are also encouraged to use resources such as ratemyteacher.com to see if they can create a class schedule that is conducive to their learning style and threshold. These reviews should be interpreted knowing that some students may dislike a professor for a personal reason. Students are also encouraged to get a head start on assignments or become familiar with the material during breaks to lessen the workload of the semester. Counselors at Indiana’s secondary institutions are equipped with a variety of tools and techniques to help college students navigate the convoluted college life.

Attention Deficit Disorder Medication and College Students

College students are being drawn to medications like Adderall in an attempt to increase their scores. The prescription medication is used to help those with Attention deficit disorder or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder focus. The drug is believed to increase focus and prevent fatigue in those who do not have those disorders. Students take the drug when they are preparing for exams to help them focus. The Treatment Helpline has stated that approximately 25% of college students use prescription drugs to help them study. This is a large percentage of college students, but the actual amount is much higher. There have been zero results from studies proving that these drugs help increase scores.

How to Properly Increase Scores and Avoid Addiction

Increasing test scores and preventing substance abuse or addiction is simple; do not use drugs. Any student who is struggling in class can speak with their professor. Professors are there to help you succeed. They can refer you to their office hours for added help, suggest another students help who might be performing at a much higher level, or direct you to the campus tutoring center. Tutoring and counseling centers are available on all campuses with wide ranging hours of operation. Study drugs do not exist and they do not work. Using them is abusing them. The only way to true success is discovering the best way to study and ways to increase focus naturally. Taking a pill does not increase your I.Q. and will only lead to substance abuse, addiction, and lower scores. Addiction is a very serious issue in the United States and continues to rise. College students are becoming increasingly susceptible to substance abuse and addiction. They should stay clear of drugs because it can severely damage their future and studies. Anyone suffering from a study drug addiction should seek professional help immediately, which is provided on most American campuses.

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